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Title: Caregivers’ Role-taking during the Use of Discussion Prompts in At-Home Engineering Kits
This study presents a video-based case study of families who used discussion prompts in the at-home engineering kits. We examine different roles that caregivers took on during the implementation of the prompts to organize families’ engineering learning activities. Narrative accounts and transcriptions were analyzed to investigate the different roles that caregivers took. Three roles emerged: caregivers as monitor; caregivers as mentor; caregivers as partner. We further coded families’ talks to investigate how three different caregivers’ roles influenced families’ engineering practices and caregiver-child talk types. Preliminary findings illustrate how three caregivers’ roles enabled and constrained different types of engineering practices and caregiver-child talk types. Findings contribute to future considerations in designing discussion prompts for at-home engineering kits.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1759314
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10284803
Journal Name:
International Society of the Learning Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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