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Title: STEM Moments in the Family Context throughout Engineering Design Challenge Activities (Fundamental)
Research on interactions between caregivers and children have long been reported in science museum experiences. However, the interactions between caregivers and children in home environments are rarely investigated. By comparison, research on the experience of the engineering design challenge activities in a family context is even less. This case study aimed to examine interactions of two families in their home as they engaged with engineering design challenge kits that have the potential to support children’s foundational understanding of STEM concepts. Using social-cultural constructivism as a lens, about 370 minutes of video data was analyzed. Data coding revealed three types of interactions that facilitated children’s understanding of STEM concepts: teaching, build up, and synthesized moments. These three moments were interdependent but included different emphasis of caregivers’ and children’s engagement. Although there is a limitation of this study to generalize the findings, our results contribute to understand how caregivers and children play with the materials, tools, and their ideas in their home environments and how caregivers used different facilitation approaches without any training prior to engaging with the engineering kits.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1759259
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10346641
Journal Name:
Zone 1 Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education
ISSN:
2332-368X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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