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Title: Caregivers’ Multiple Roles in Supporting their Child through an Engineering Design Project
Caregivers are one of the most significant influences in their children’s engineering engagement at a young age; however, the roles caregivers can play in supporting their children is less understood. Employing an intrinsic case study on a five-month engineering program conducted in an out-of-school context, we illustrate the multiple and different roles that three caregivers enacted, and the contextual factors of the program that influenced and shaped their role enactment. We observed 12 dynamic, complex, and evolving roles that caregivers endorsed to support their child throughout the engineering design process. These roles were situated within preexisting rules and expectations as caregivers while also developing an understanding of the rules and expectations of an engineer through their social interactions with volunteer engineers and makers. This work contributes to our understanding of how to create environments to enable caregivers to best support their children’s STEM learning process.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1759314
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10284805
Journal Name:
American Society for Engineering Education
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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