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Title: Rethinking Sampling in 3D Point Cloud Generative Adversarial Networks
In this paper, we examine the long-neglected yet important effects of point sampling patterns in point cloud GANs. Through extensive experiments, we show that sampling-insensitive discriminators (e.g.PointNet-Max) produce shape point clouds with point clustering artifacts while sampling-oversensitive discriminators (e.g. PointNet++, DGCNN) fail to guide valid shape generation. We propose the concept of sampling spectrum to depict the different sampling sensitivities of discriminators. We further study how different evaluation metrics weigh the sampling pattern against the geometry and propose several perceptual metrics forming a sampling spectrum of metrics. Guided by the proposed sampling spectrum, we discover a middle-point sampling-aware baseline discriminator, PointNet-Mix, which improves all existing point cloud generators by a large margin on sampling-related metrics. We point out that, though recent research has been focused on the generator design, the main bottleneck of point cloud GAN actually lies in the discriminator design. Our work provides both suggestions and tools for building future discriminators. We will release the code to facilitate future research.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1763268
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10285245
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshop
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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