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Title: Development of LiDAR Based Navigation System for Automation of Tree Harvesting Process
This study focuses on an autonomous moving system for the automation of the harvesting process by high-performance machines in the forestry. Many fatal accidents occur due to the harvesting process. In this research, a navigation system has been developed to enable autonomous travel between accumulation sites and trees to be harvested to improve productivity and safety. A 3D map is generated by LiDAR observation, and harvester moves autonomously towards the tree as specified by the operator. A test of the harvesting process was performed in an experimental environment. The evaluation focused on the required time of the autonomous movement in the process. The effectiveness of the system was confirmed in operations such as row thinning by the results.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1818884
NSF-PAR ID:
10289946
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of International Conference on Artificial Life and Robotics
ISSN:
2435-9157
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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