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Title: Minecraft as a Generative Platform for Analyzing and Practicing Spatial Reasoning
As excitement for Minecraft continues to grow, we consider its potential to function as an engaging environment for practicing and studying spatial reasoning. To support this exposition, we describe a glimpse of our current analysis of spatial reasoning skills in Minecraft. Twenty university students participated in a laboratory study that asked them to recreate three existing buildings in Minecraft. Screen captures of user actions, together with eye tracking data, helped us identify ways that students utilize perspective taking, constructing mental representations, building and place-marking, and error checking. These findings provide an initial impetus for further studies of the types of spatial skills that students may exhibit while playing Minecraft. It also introduces questions about how the design of Minecraft activities may promote, or inhibit, the use of certain spatial skills.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Editors:
Šķilters, J.; Newcombe, N.; Uttal, D.
Award ID(s):
1822865
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10290976
Journal Name:
Spatial Cognition XII. Spatial Cognition 2020. Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Volume:
12162
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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