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Title: Using 3D Printing to Teach Design and Manufacturing Concepts
Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is commonly shown to students through low cost 3D printers. Many high school and community college educators have access to 3D printers at their home institutions. In this study, Research Experience for Teachers (RET) participants developed a set of modules which can be integrated with a design project given at both the high school and college curriculum levels to explore the concepts of manufacturing and design (e.g., dimensioning and tolerancing, Design for X, Proof of Concept, etc.). The study identified a product in which these concepts can be integrated, and developed a set of constraints the students need to consider in their design project. It was the goal of the RET participants to identify best practices for teaching 3D printing and develop projects to explain design and manufacturing concepts through 3D printing.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1711603
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10293627
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2020 IISE Annual Conference
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-6
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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