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Title: Analysis of Positional Tracking Space Usage when using Teleportation
Teleportation is a widely used virtual locomotion technique that allows users to navigate beyond the confines of available tracking space with a low possibility of inducing VR sickness. Because teleportation requires little physical effort and lets users traverse large distances instantly, a risk is that over time users might only use teleportation and abandon walking input. This paper provides insight into this risk by presenting results from a study that analyzes tracking space usage of three popular commercially available VR games that rely on teleportation. Our study confirms that positional tracking usage is limited by the use of teleportation.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1911041
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10293902
Journal Name:
2021 IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces Abstracts and Workshops (VRW)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
480 to 481
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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