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Title: Walking and Teleportation in Wide-area Virtual Reality Experiences
Location-based or Out-of-Home Entertainment refers to experiences such as theme and amusement parks, laser tag and paintball arenas, roller and ice skating rinks, zoos and aquariums, or science centers and museums among many other family entertainment and cultural venues. More recently, location-based VR has emerged as a new category of out-of-home entertainment. These VR experiences can be likened to social entertainment options such as laser tag, where physical movement is an inherent part of the experience versus at-home VR experiences where physical movement often needs to be replaced by artificial locomotion techniques due to tracking space constraints. In this work, we present the first VR study to understand the impact of natural walking in a large physical space on presence and user preference. We compare it with teleportation in the same large space, since teleportation is the most commonly used locomotion technique for consumer, at-home VR. Our results show that walking was overwhelmingly preferred by the participants and teleportation leads to significantly higher self-reported simulator sickness. The data also shows a trend towards higher self-reported presence for natural walking.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1911230
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10330669
Journal Name:
International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality
Volume:
2020
ISSN:
2473-0726
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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