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This content will become publicly available on September 21, 2022

Title: X-ray Diffraction and Equation of State of the C-S-H Room-Temperature Superconductor
X-ray diffraction indicates that the structure of the recently discovered carbonaceous sulfur hydride (C-S-H) room temperature superconductor is derived from previously established van der Waals compounds found in the H2S-H2 and CH4-H2 systems. Crystals of the superconducting phase were produced by a photochemical synthesis technique leading to the superconducting critical temperature Tc of 288 K at 267 GPa. X-ray diffraction patterns measured from 124 to 178 GPa, within the pressure range of the superconducting phase, are consistent with an orthorhombic structure derived from the Al2Cu-type determined for (H2S)2H2 and (CH4)2H2 that differs from those predicted and observed for the S-H system to these pressures. The formation and stability of the C-S-H compound can be understood in terms of the close similarity in effective volumes of the H2S and CH4 components, and denser carbon-bearing S-H phases may form at higher pressures. The results are crucial for understanding the very high superconducting Tc found in the C-S-H system at megabar pressures.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1933622
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10295407
Journal Name:
Journal of chemical physics
ISSN:
1089-7690
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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