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Title: Introducing an RME-based task sequence to support the guided reinvention of vector spaces
In this paper, we introduce an RME-based (Freudenthal, 1991) task sequence intended to support the guided reinvention of the linear algebra topic of vector spaces. We also share the results of a paired teaching experiment (Steffe & Thompson, 2000) with two students. The results show how students can leverage their work in the problem context to develop more general notions of Null Space. This work informs further revisions to the task statements for using these materials in a whole-class setting.
Authors:
Editors:
S. S. Karunakaran, & A.
Award ID(s):
1914793
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10297023
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
222-228
ISSN:
2474-9346
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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