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Title: First-Year Engineering Students’ Understanding and Application of Models: Comparing Impact of CATIA vs. MATLAB Courses
To succeed in engineering careers, students must be able to create and apply models to certain problems. The different types of modeling skills include physical, mathematical, computational, graphing, and financial. However, many students struggle to define and form relevant models in their engineering courses. We are hoping that the students are able to better define and apply models in their engineering courses after they have completed the MATLAB and/or CATIA courses. We also are hoping to see a difference in model identification between the MATLAB and CATIA courses. All students in the MATLAB and CATIA courses must be able to understand and create models in order to solve problems and think critically in engineering. Students need foundational knowledge about basic modeling skills that will be effective in their course. The goal is for students to create an approach to help them solve problems logically and apply different modeling skills.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1827600
NSF-PAR ID:
10298252
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ASEE Southeastern Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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