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Title: Make with Data: Challenging and contextualizing open-source data with personal and local knowledge
In this poster we describe Make with Data, a two-year project that invites teachers and students from public high schools to work with professional data scientists and open-source data to explore issues important to their local community. While the negotiation of the personal and the quantitative resulted in tensions, Make with Data students found their personal experiences a useful tool for adding context and complexity to the phenomena being studied.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1759224
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10299038
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 15th International Conference of the Learning Sciences—ICLS 2021
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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