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Title: Measuring and Replicating the 1–20 μm Energy Distributions of the Coldest Brown Dwarfs: Rotating, Turbulent, and Nonadiabatic Atmospheres
Award ID(s):
1910969
NSF-PAR ID:
10299207
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
918
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0004-637X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
11
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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