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Title: QA-GNN: Reasoning with Language Models and Knowledge Graphs for Question Answering
The problem of answering questions using knowledge from pre-trained language models (LMs) and knowledge graphs (KGs) presents two challenges: given a QA context (question and answer choice), methods need to (i) identify relevant knowledge from large KGs, and (ii) perform joint reasoning over the QA context and KG. Here we propose a new model, QA-GNN, which addresses the above challenges through two key innovations: (i) relevance scoring, where we use LMs to estimate the importance of KG nodes relative to the given QA context, and (ii) joint reasoning, where we connect the QA context and KG to form a joint graph, and mutually update their representations through graph-based message passing. We evaluate QA-GNN on the CommonsenseQA and OpenBookQA datasets, and show its improvement over existing LM and LM+KG models, as well as its capability to perform interpretable and structured reasoning, e.g., correctly handling negation in questions.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2030477 1918940 1934578 1835598
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10300278
Journal Name:
North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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