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Title: Surface–atmosphere fluxes of volatile organic compounds in Beijing
Abstract. Mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were recordedin two field campaigns in central Beijing as part of the Air Pollution andHuman Health in a Chinese Megacity (APHH) project. These data were used tocalculate, for the first time in Beijing, the surface–atmosphere fluxes ofVOCs using eddy covariance, giving a top-down estimation of VOC emissionsfrom a central area of the city. The results were then used to evaluate theaccuracy of the Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC). TheAPHH winter and summer campaigns took place in November and December 2016and May and June 2017, respectively. The largest VOC fluxes observed were ofsmall oxygenated compounds such as methanol, ethanol + formic acid andacetaldehyde, with average emission rates of 8.31 ± 8.5, 3.97 ± 3.9 and 1.83 ± 2.0 nmol m−2 s−1, respectively, in the summer.A large flux of isoprene was observed in the summer, with an average emissionrate of 5.31 ± 7.7 nmol m−2 s−1. While oxygenated VOCs madeup 60 % of the molar VOC flux measured, when fluxes were scaled by ozoneformation potential and peroxyacyl nitrate (PAN) formation potential thehigh reactivity of isoprene and monoterpenes meant that these speciesrepresented 30 % and 28 % of the flux contribution to ozone and PANformation potential, respectively. Comparison of measured fluxes with theemission inventory showed that the inventory failed to capture the magnitudeof more » VOC emissions at the local scale. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1724433
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10300752
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume:
20
Issue:
23
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
15101 to 15125
ISSN:
1680-7324
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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