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Title: High Altitude Platform Stations (HAPS): Architecture and System Performance
High Altitude Platform Station (HAPS) has the potential to provide global wireless connectivity and data services such as high-speed wireless backhaul, industrial Internet of things (IoT), and public safety for large areas not served by terrestrial networks. A unified HAPS design is desired to support various use cases and a wide range of requirements. In this paper, we present two architecture designs of the HAPS system: i) repeater based HAPS, and ii) base station based HAPS, which are both viable technical solutions. The energy efficiency is analyzed and compared between the two architectures using consumption factor theory. The system performance of these two architectures is evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations and is characterized in metrics of spectral efficiency using LTE band 1 for both single-cell and multi-cell cases. Both designs can provide good downlink spectral efficiency and coverage, while the uplink coverage is significantly limited by UE transmit power and antenna gain. Using directional antennas at the UEs can improve the system performance for both downlink and uplink.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1909206 2037845
NSF-PAR ID:
10309454
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference
ISSN:
1042-4369
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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