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Title: Formation of condensable organic vapors from anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is strongly perturbed by NO<sub><i>x</i></sub> in eastern China
Abstract. Oxygenated organic molecules (OOMs) are the crucial intermediates linkingvolatile organic compounds (VOCs) to secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in theatmosphere, but comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of OOMsand their formation from VOCs is still missing. Ambient observations ofOOMs using recently developed mass spectrometry techniques are stilllimited, especially in polluted urban atmospheres where VOCs and oxidants areextremely variable and complex. Here, we investigate OOMs, measured by anitrate-ion-based chemical ionization mass spectrometer at Nanjing ineastern China, through performing positive matrix factorization on binnedmass spectra (binPMF). The binPMF analysis reveals three factors aboutanthropogenic VOC (AVOC) daytime chemistry, three isoprene-relatedfactors, three factors about biogenic VOC (BVOC) nighttime chemistry, andthree factors about nitrated phenols. All factors are influenced by NOxin different ways and to different extents. Over 1000 non-nitro moleculeshave been identified and then reconstructed from the selected solution ofbinPMF, and about 72 % of the total signals are contributed bynitrogen-containing OOMs, mostly regarded as organic nitrates formed throughperoxy radicals terminated by nitric oxide or nitrate-radical-initiatedoxidations. Moreover, multi-nitrates account for about 24 % of the totalsignals, indicating the significant presence of multiple generations,especially for isoprene (e.g., C5H10O8N2 andC5H9O10N3). Additionally, the distribution of OOMconcentration on the carbon number confirms their precursors are driven by AVOCsmixed with enhanced BVOCs during summer. Our results highlight the decisiverole of NOx in OOM formation in densely populated areas, and we encouragemore studies on the dramatic interactions between anthropogenic and biogenicemissions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1807530
NSF-PAR ID:
10311504
Author(s) / Creator(s):
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Date Published:
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume:
21
Issue:
19
ISSN:
1680-7324
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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