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Title: Ditto: Fair and Robust Federated Learning Through Personalization
Fairness and robustness are two important concerns for federated learning systems. In this work, we identify that robustness to data and model poisoning attacks and fairness, measured as the uniformity of performance across devices, are competing constraints in statistically heterogeneous networks. To address these constraints, we propose employing a simple, general framework for personalized federated learning, Ditto, and develop a scalable solver for it. Theoretically, we analyze the ability of Ditto to achieve fairness and robustness simultaneously on a class of linear problems. Empirically, across a suite of federated datasets, we show that Ditto not only achieves competitive performance relative to recent personalization methods, but also enables more accurate, robust, and fair models relative to state-of-the-art fair or robust baselines.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1838017
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10311656
Journal Name:
International Conference on Machine Learning
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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