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Title: The Lyman Continuum Escape Survey: Connecting Time-dependent [O iii] and [O ii] Line Emission with Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction in Simulations of Galaxy Formation
Award ID(s):
1828315
NSF-PAR ID:
10313059
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
902
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2041-8213
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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