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Title: Integrated Sensing System for Monitoring Interrelated Physiological Parameters in Young and Aged Adults: A Pilot Study.
Acute injury to aged individuals represents a significant challenge to the global healthcare community as these injuries are frequently treated in a reactive method due to the infeasibility of frequent visits to the hospital for biometric monitoring. However, there is potential to prevent a large number of these cases through passive, at-home monitoring of multiple physiological parameters related to various causes that are common to aged adults in general. This research strives to implement wearable devices, ambient “smart home” devices, and minimally invasive blood and urine analysis to test the feasibility of implementation of a multitude of research-level (i.e. not yet clinically validated) methods simultaneously in a “smart system”. The system comprises measures of balance, breathing, heart rate, metabolic rate, joint flexibility, hydration, and physical performance functions in addition to lab testing related to biological aging and mechanical cell strength. A proof-of-concept test is illustrated for two adult males of different ages: a 22-year-old and a 73-year-old matched in body mass index (BMI). The integrated system is test in this work, a pilot study, demonstrating functionality and age-related clinical relevance. The two subjects had physiological measurements taken in several settings during the pilot study: seated, biking, and lying down. Balance more » measurements indicated changes in sway area of 45.45% and 25.44%, respectively for before/after biking. The 22-year-old and the 73-year-old saw heart rate variabilities of 0.11 and 0.02 seconds at resting conditions, and metabolic rate changes of 277.38% and 222.23%, respectively, in comparison between the biking and seated conditions. A smart camera was used to assess biking speed and the 22- and 73-year-old subjects biked at 60 rpm and 28.5 rpm, respectively. The 22-year-old subject saw a 7 times greater electrical resistance change using a joint flexibility sensor inside of their index finger in comparison with the 73-year-old male. The 22 and 73-year-old males saw respective 28% and 48% increases in their urine ammonium concentration before/after the experiment. The average lengths of the telomere DNA from the two subjects were measured to be 12.1 kb (22-year-old) and 6.9 kb (73-year-old), consistent with their biological ages. The study probed feasibility of 1) multi-metric assessment under free living conditions, and 2) tracking of the various metrics over time. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1650566
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10315429
Journal Name:
International journal of prognostics and health management
Volume:
12
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2153-2648
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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