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Title: Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest; concentrations of foliar metabolites: polyamines, amino acids, chlorophyll, carotenoids, soluble proteins, soluble elements, sugars, and total nitrogen and carbon in red maple (Acer rubrum) trees.
Abstract
Foliage was collected in 2015 and 2017 from red maple trees at the Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). AnalysesMore>>
Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher:
Environmental Data Initiative
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10316932
Award ID(s):
1637685
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract
    Root damage, as relative electrolyte leakage, was assessed following winter freeze-thaw cycle experimental treatments in 2014 and 2015 on all Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) plots. Reference (or control) plots are shared with the collaborating Northern Forest DroughtNet experiment. There are six plots total (each 11 x 14m). Two are warmed 5 degrees C throughout the growing season (Plots 3 and 4). Two others are warmed 5 degrees C in the growing season and have snow removed during winter to induce soil freeze/thaw cycles (Plots 5 and 6). Four kilometers (2.5 mi) of heating cable are buried in the soil to warm these four plots. Two additional plots serve as controls for our experiment (Plots 1 and 2). Analysis and results from these data are presented in Sanders-DeMott 2018. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. Sanders-DeMott, R., Sorensen, P.O., Reinmann, A.B. et al. Growing season warming and winter freeze–thaw cycles reduce root nitrogen uptake capacity and increase soil solution nitrogen in a northern forest ecosystem. Biogeochemistry 137,More>>
  2. Abstract
    Resin available soil solution nitrogen was measured during seasonal incubations in 2014 and 2015 on all Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) plots. Reference (or control) plots are shared with the collaborating Northern Forest DroughtNet experiment. There are six plots total (each 11 x 14m). Two are warmed 5 degrees C throughout the growing season (Plots 3 and 4). Two others are warmed 5 degrees C in the growing season and have snow removed during winter to induce soil freeze/thaw cycles (Plots 5 and 6). Four kilometers (2.5 mi) of heating cable are buried in the soil to warm these four plots. Two additional plots serve as controls for our experiment (Plots 1 and 2). Analysis and results from these data are presented in Sanders-DeMott 2018. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. Sanders-DeMott, R., Sorensen, P.O., Reinmann, A.B. et al. Growing season warming and winter freeze–thaw cycles reduce root nitrogen uptake capacity and increase soil solution nitrogen in a northern forest ecosystem. Biogeochemistry 137, 337–349 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0422-5
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