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Title: Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: Soil Freezing Study (SFS) In Situ Measurements of Snow and Soil Frost Depth
Abstract
Climate models for the northeastern United States (U.S.) over the next century predict an increase in air temperature between 2.8 and 4.3 °C and a decrease in the averageMore>>
Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher:
Environmental Data Initiative
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10316992
Award ID(s):
1637685
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract
    The climate is changing in many temperate forests with the amount of forest area dominated by sugar maple experiencing an insulating snowpack expected to shrink between 49 and 95% compared to 1951-2005 values. A reduced snowpack and increased depth and duration of soil frost can injure or kill fine roots, which are essential for plant water and nutrient uptake. These adverse impacts on tree roots can have important impacts on tree growth and ecosystem carbon sequestration. We evaluated the effects of changing winter climate, including snow and soil frost dynamics, by using tree cores to measure sugar maple radial growth rates in the Soil Freezing Study plots at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. Analysis of these data are published in: Reinmann AB, Susser JR, Demara EMC, and Templer PH. 2019. Declines in northern forest tree growth following snowpack decline and soil freezing. Global Change Biology. 25(2):420-430. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14420
  2. Abstract
    Root damage, as relative electrolyte leakage, was assessed following winter freeze-thaw cycle experimental treatments in 2014 and 2015 on all Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) plots. Reference (or control) plots are shared with the collaborating Northern Forest DroughtNet experiment. There are six plots total (each 11 x 14m). Two are warmed 5 degrees C throughout the growing season (Plots 3 and 4). Two others are warmed 5 degrees C in the growing season and have snow removed during winter to induce soil freeze/thaw cycles (Plots 5 and 6). Four kilometers (2.5 mi) of heating cable are buried in the soil to warm these four plots. Two additional plots serve as controls for our experiment (Plots 1 and 2). Analysis and results from these data are presented in Sanders-DeMott 2018. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. Sanders-DeMott, R., Sorensen, P.O., Reinmann, A.B. et al. Growing season warming and winter freeze–thaw cycles reduce root nitrogen uptake capacity and increase soil solution nitrogen in a northern forest ecosystem. Biogeochemistry 137,More>>
  3. Abstract
    Foliage was collected in 2015 and 2017 from red maple trees at the Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). Analyses of foliar metabolites include polyamines, amino acids, chlorophylls, carotenoids, soluble proteins, soluble inorganic elements, sugars, and total nitrogen and carbon. There are six (11 x 14m) plots in total in this study; two control (plots 1 and 2), two warmed 5 degrees (°) Celsius (C) above ambient throughout the growing season (plots 3 and 4), and two warmed 5 °C in the growing season, with snow removal during the winter to induce soil freezing and then warmed with buried heating cables to create a subsequent thaw (plots 5 and 6). Each soil freeze/thaw cycle includes 72 hours of soil freezing followed by 72 hours of thaw. Four kilometers (km) of heating cable are buried in the soil to warm these four plots. Together, these treatments led to warmer growing season soil temperatures and an increased frequency of soil freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs) in winter. Our goal was to determine how these changes in soil temperature affect foliar nitrogen (N) and carbon metabolism of red maple trees. These data were gathered asMore>>
  4. Abstract
    Fine root nitrogen uptake capacity was measured on excised roots prior to experimental treatment in 2013 and throughout the growing seasons of 2014 and 2015 on all Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) plots. Reference (or control) plots are shared with the collaborating Northern Forest DroughtNet experiment. There are six plots total (each 11 x 14m). Two are warmed 5 degrees C throughout the growing season (Plots 3 and 4). Two others are warmed 5 degrees C in the growing season and have snow removed during winter to induce soil freeze/thaw cycles (Plots 5 and 6). Four kilometers (2.5 mi) of heating cable are buried in the soil to warm these four plots. Two additional plots serve as controls for our experiment (Plots 1 and 2). Analysis and results from these data are presented in Sanders-DeMott 2018. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. Sanders-DeMott, R., Sorensen, P.O., Reinmann, A.B. et al. Growing season warming and winter freeze–thaw cycles reduce root nitrogen uptake capacity and increase soil solution nitrogenMore>>
  5. Abstract
    Resin available soil solution nitrogen was measured during seasonal incubations in 2014 and 2015 on all Climate Change Across Seasons Experiment (CCASE) plots. Reference (or control) plots are shared with the collaborating Northern Forest DroughtNet experiment. There are six plots total (each 11 x 14m). Two are warmed 5 degrees C throughout the growing season (Plots 3 and 4). Two others are warmed 5 degrees C in the growing season and have snow removed during winter to induce soil freeze/thaw cycles (Plots 5 and 6). Four kilometers (2.5 mi) of heating cable are buried in the soil to warm these four plots. Two additional plots serve as controls for our experiment (Plots 1 and 2). Analysis and results from these data are presented in Sanders-DeMott 2018. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. Sanders-DeMott, R., Sorensen, P.O., Reinmann, A.B. et al. Growing season warming and winter freeze–thaw cycles reduce root nitrogen uptake capacity and increase soil solution nitrogen in a northern forest ecosystem. Biogeochemistry 137, 337–349 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0422-5