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Title: Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: Soil-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane on snow removal plots
Abstract
Soil atmosphere fluxes of the trace gases; carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) have been measured at several locations at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF)More>>
Creator(s):
;
Publisher:
Environmental Data Initiative
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10316994
Award ID(s):
1637685
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract
    Soil atmosphere fluxes of the trace gases; carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) have been measured at several locations at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) including 1) the “freeze” study reference plots that provide contrast between stands dominated (80%) by sugar maple versus yellow birch and low and high elevation areas, 2) the Bear Brook Watershed where trace gas sampling is coordinated with long-term monitoring of microbial biomass and activity and 3) watershed 1 where trace gas sampling locations were co-located with long-term microbial biomass and activity monitoring sites that are located near a subset of the lysimeter sites established for the calcium addition study on this watershed. This dataset contains the Watershed 1 and Bear Brook data. Freeze plot trace gas can be found in: https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/mapbrowse?scope=knb-lter-hbr&identifier=251. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  2. Abstract
    Long-term monitoring of soil nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations, microbial biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, microbial respiration, potential nitrification and N mineralization rates, pH, and denitrification potential has been ongoing at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest since 1994. Samples have been collected in the Bear Brook Watershed (west of Watershed 6) beginning in 1994. In 1998, our sampling regime was extended to Watershed 1 in an effort to monitor and quantify microbial response to a whole-watershed calcium addition. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  3. Abstract
    In 1997, as part of a study of the relationships between snow depth, soil freezing and nutrient cycling (http://www.ecostudies.org/people_sci_groffman_snow_summary.html), we established eight 10 x 10-m plots located within four stands; two dominated (80%) by sugar maple and two dominated by yellow birch, with one snow reduction (freeze) and one reference plot in each stand. In 2001, we established eight new 10-m x 10-m plots (4 treatment, 4 reference) in four new sites; two high elevation, north facing and two low elevation, south facing maple-beech-birch stands. To establish plots for the “freeze” study, we cleared minor amounts of understory vegetation from all (both freeze and reference) plots (to facilitate shoveling). We then installed soil solution samplers (zero tension lysimeters), thermistors for soil temperature monitoring, water content (time domain) reflectometers (for measuring soil moisture), soil atmosphere sampling probes, minirhizotron access tubes, and trace gas flux measurement chambers (described below). All plots were equipped with dataloggers to allow for continuous monitoring of soil moisture and temperature. Treatments (keep plots snow free by shoveling through the end of January) were applied in the winters of 1997/98, 1998/99, 2002/2003 and 2003/2004. Measurements of soil nitrate (NO3 -) and ammonium (NH4 +) concentrations, microbial biomassMore>>
  4. Abstract
    In early September 2015, we sampled five debris dams in both the stream draining W1 and Bear Brook, immediately downstream of W6. This dataset contains laboratory analysis of potential denitrification enzyme activity assays from these sediment cores. Details of the analysis method are reported in the supporting information of Marinos et al. 2018. These data are being published only in the interest of full data transparency. These data have very important limitations, discussed in the supporting information of Marinos et al. 2018, and the authors advise anybody considering reusing this data to be appropriately cautious. Marinos, R. E., Campbell, J. L., Driscoll, C. T., Likens, G. E., McDowell, W. H., Rosi, E. J., Rustad, L. E., & Bernhardt, E. S. (2018). Give and Take: A Watershed Acid Rain Mitigation Experiment Increases Baseflow Nitrogen Retention but Increases Stormflow Nitrogen Export. Environmental Science & Technology, 52(22), 13155–13165. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.8b03553 These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  5. Abstract
    The valley-wide plots are a grid of 431 sites along fifteen N–S transects established at 500-m intervals spanning the entire Hubbard Brook Valley. This dataset includes total soil carbon, nitrogen and organic matter content, potential net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates, microbial respiration rates, soil water content and holding capacity, soil ammonium and nitrate concentrations, soil pH, and tree composition in a subset of 100 randomly selected plots in 2000. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. An analysis of these data can be found in: Venterea, R. T., Lovett, G. M., Groffman, P. M., & Schwarz, P. A. (2003). Landscape patterns of net nitrification in a northern hardwood-conifer forest. Soil Science Soc. Amer. J., 67, 527–539. https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2003.5270