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Title: Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: Soil-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane on Watershed 1 and Bear Brook
Abstract
Soil atmosphere fluxes of the trace gases; carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) have been measured at several locations at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF)More>>
Creator(s):
;
Publisher:
Environmental Data Initiative
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10316995
Award ID(s):
1637685
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract
    Soil atmosphere fluxes of the trace gases; carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) have been measured at several locations at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) including 1) the “freeze” study reference plots that provide contrast between stands dominated (80%) by sugar maple versus yellow birch and low and high elevation areas, 2) the Bear Brook Watershed where trace gas sampling is coordinated with long-term monitoring of microbial biomass and activity and 3) watershed 1 where trace gas sampling locations were co-located with long-term microbial biomass and activity monitoring sites that are located near a subset of the lysimeter sites established for the calcium addition study on this watershed. This dataset contains the Freeze study data. Watershed 1 and Bear Brook trace gas data can be found in: https://portal.edirepository.org/nis/mapbrowse?scope=knb-lter-hbr&identifier=116. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These data have been published in: Groffman, P. M., Hardy, J. P., Driscoll, C. T., & Fahey, T. J. (2006). Snow depth, soil freezing, and fluxes of carbon dioxide,More>>
  2. Abstract
    Long-term monitoring of soil nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations, microbial biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, microbial respiration, potential nitrification and N mineralization rates, pH, and denitrification potential has been ongoing at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest since 1994. Samples have been collected in the Bear Brook Watershed (west of Watershed 6) beginning in 1994. In 1998, our sampling regime was extended to Watershed 1 in an effort to monitor and quantify microbial response to a whole-watershed calcium addition. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
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