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Title: Lysimeter chemistry from the Ice Storm Experiment (ISE) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest
Abstract
An ice storm simulation was performed at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest to evaluate impacts of these extreme weather events on northern hardwood forests. Water was pumped from theMore>>
Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher:
Environmental Data Initiative
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10317016
Award ID(s):
1637685
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract
    The ice storm experiment was a novel experimental approach creating a suite of ice storms in a mature hardwood forest in New Hampshire, USA. The experiment included five ice storm intensities (0, 6.4, 12.7, and 19.1 mm radial ice accretion) applied in a single year, and one ice storm intensity (12.7 mm) applied in two consecutive years. This dataset quantifies the coarse woody debris transferred from the forest canopy to the soil under the different icing conditions. In this forest, little damage occurred below 6.4 mm radial ice accretion, moderate damage occurred with up to 12.7 mm of accretion, and significant branch breakage and canopy damage occurred with 19.1 mm of ice. The icing in consecutive years demonstrated an interactive effect of ice storm frequency and severity such that some branches damaged in the first year of icing appeared to remain in the canopy and then fall to the ground in the second year of icing. These results have implications for National Weather Service ice storm warning levels, and they provide a quantitative assessment of ice-load related inputs of forest debris that will be useful to municipalities creating response plans for current and future ice storms. These data wereMore>>
  2. Abstract
    An ice storm simulation was performed at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest to evaluate impacts of these extreme weather events on northern hardwood forests. Water was pumped from the main branch of Hubbard Brook and sprayed above the forest canopy in subfreezing conditions so that it rained down and froze on contact with trees. The experiment included five ice storm intensities (0, 6.4, 12.7 and 19.1 mm radial ice accretion) applied in a single year, and one ice storm intensity (12.7 mm) applied in two consecutive years. Measurements of soil respiration were made with an infrared gas analyzer during the snow-free season before and after the ice was applied. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  3. Abstract
    To evaluate the effects of ice storm disturbance on forest canopy structure and complexity terrestrial lidar data were collected within the Hubbard Brook Ice Storm Experiment plots starting in 2015 (prior to ice treatment) and annually thereafter. Data were collected using a ground-based portable canopy lidar (PCL) system during the growing season in August of each year along 5 permanently marked 30 m transects in each 20 x 30 m ISE plot. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  4. Abstract
    Fine litterfall (leaves, twigs, fruits, seeds, etc.) is collected in Watershed 1, Watershed 5, the Throughfall plots and the Bear Brook Watershed reference forest, located to the west of Watershed 6, to quantify carbon and nutrient flux associated with this important pathway. In addition, measurements of area per leaf are combined with counts of leaves for each tree species to quantify leaf area index of the forest. These measurements have facilitated quantification of ice storm effects and species declines (paper birch, sugar maple). These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES). The HBES is a collaborative effort at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, which is operated and maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station.
  5. Abstract
    Hubbard Brook weather notes (aka field notes) are daily weather observations by technicians at Hubbard Brook – a record that began in the mid-1970s, and continues today. Weekend weather notes are included, and are observations from their nearby homes in Thornton, Campton or Plymouth NH. These notes capture subtle details in weather that are not recorded by sensors at Hubbard Brook. These may include, but are not limited to, thunderstorms, frontal passages, named storms (i.e. Hurricanes, Tropical storms), fog, ground surface frost, precipitation type, and cloud types. In this data package, the weather notes from 1990-2019 have been scanned into annual pdf files, and are zipped into 5 year increments for download. Temperature and precipitation data are noted on the weather note sheets – these data are from hygrothermographs and precipitation recording rain gage at STA/RG22 (Hubbard Brook Headquarters), and beginning in 2014-15, from digital sensors. Note that temperature and precipitation from these handwritten sheets should not be used for data analysis. Temperature and precipitation finalized QA/QC products are available in digital format at the links below. The handwritten weather notes should be used as reference only. These data were gathered as part of the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem StudyMore>>