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Title: Zinc limitation triggers anticipatory adaptations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ) has complex and dynamic interactions with the human host, and subpopulations of Mtb that emerge during infection can influence disease outcomes. This study implicates zinc ion (Zn 2+ ) availability as a likely driver of bacterial phenotypic heterogeneity in vivo . Zn 2+ sequestration is part of “nutritional immunity”, where the immune system limits micronutrients to control pathogen growth, but this defense mechanism seems to be ineffective in controlling Mtb infection. Nonetheless, Zn 2+ -limitation is an environmental cue sensed by Mtb , as calprotectin triggers the zinc uptake regulator (Zur) regulon response in vitro and co-localizes with Zn 2+ -limited Mtb in vivo . Prolonged Zn 2+ limitation leads to numerous physiological changes in vitro , including differential expression of certain antigens, alterations in lipid metabolism and distinct cell surface morphology. Furthermore, Mtb enduring limited Zn 2+ employ defensive measures to fight oxidative stress, by increasing expression of proteins involved in DNA repair and antioxidant activity, including well described virulence factors KatG and AhpC, along with altered utilization of redox cofactors. Here, we propose a model in which prolonged Zn 2+ limitation defines a population of Mtb with anticipatory adaptations against impending immune attack, more » based on the evidence that Zn 2+ -limited Mtb are more resistant to oxidative stress and exhibit increased survival and induce more severe pulmonary granulomas in mice. Considering that extracellular Mtb may transit through the Zn 2+ -limited caseum before infecting naïve immune cells or upon host-to-host transmission, the resulting phenotypic heterogeneity driven by varied Zn 2+ availability likely plays a key role during early interactions with host cells. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Sassetti, Christopher M.
Award ID(s):
1844854
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10318392
Journal Name:
PLOS Pathogens
Volume:
17
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1553-7374
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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