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Title: The binary central star of the bipolar pre-planetary nebula IRAS 08005−2356 (V510 Pup)
ABSTRACT Current models predict that binary interactions are a major ingredient in the formation of bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) and pre-planetary nebulae (PPNe). Despite years of radial velocity (RV) monitoring, the paucity of known binaries amongst the latter systems means data are insufficient to examine this relationship in detail. In this work, we report on the discovery of a long-period (P = 2654 ± 124 d) binary at the centre of the Galactic bipolar PPN IRAS 08005−2356 (V510 Pup), determined from long-term spectroscopic and near-infrared time-series data. The spectroscopic orbit is fitted with an eccentricity of 0.36 ± 0.05, which is similar to that of other long-period post-AGB binaries. Time-resolved Hα profiles reveal high-velocity outflows (jets) with deprojected velocities up to 231$_{-27}^{+31}$ km s−1 seen at phases when the luminous primary is behind the jet. The outflow traced by Hα is likely produced via accretion on to a main-sequence companion, for which we calculate a mass of 0.63 ± 0.13 M⊙. This discovery is one of the first cases of a confirmed binary PPN and demonstrates the importance of high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring surveys using large telescopes in revealing binarity among these systems.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1812874
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10319081
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
508
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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