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Title: Anisotropic Melting of Frustrated Ising Antiferromagnets
Magnetic frustrations and dimensionality play an important role in determining the nature of the magnetic long-range order and how it melts at temperatures above the ordering transition TN. In this work, we use large-scale Monte Carlo simulations to study these phenomena in a class of frustrated Ising spin models in two spatial dimensions. We find that the melting of the magnetic long-range order into an isotropic gas-like paramagnet proceeds via an intermediate stage where the classical spins remain anisotropically correlated. This correlated paramagnet exists in a temperature range TN < T < T, whose width increases as magnetic frustrations grow. This intermediate phase is typically characterized by short-range correlations, however the two-dimensional nature of the model allows for an additional exotic feature – formation of an incommensurate liquid-like phase with algebraically decaying spin correlations. The two-stage melting of magnetic order is generic and pertinent to many frustrated quasi-2D magnets with large (essentially classical) spins.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1917511
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10323675
Journal Name:
Physical review letters
ISSN:
1092-0145
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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