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Title: Room-temperature intrinsic ferromagnetism in epitaxial CrTe2 ultrathin films
Abstract While the discovery of two-dimensional (2D) magnets opens the door for fundamental physics and next-generation spintronics, it is technically challenging to achieve the room-temperature ferromagnetic (FM) order in a way compatible with potential device applications. Here, we report the growth and properties of single- and few-layer CrTe 2 , a van der Waals (vdW) material, on bilayer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Intrinsic ferromagnetism with a Curie temperature ( T C ) up to 300 K, an atomic magnetic moment of ~0.21  $${\mu }_{{\rm{B}}}$$ μ B /Cr and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) constant ( K u ) of 4.89 × 10 5  erg/cm 3 at room temperature in these few-monolayer films have been unambiguously evidenced by superconducting quantum interference device and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This intrinsic ferromagnetism has also been identified by the splitting of majority and minority band dispersions with ~0.2 eV at Г point using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The FM order is preserved with the film thickness down to a monolayer ( T C  ~ 200 K), benefiting from the strong PMA and weak interlayer coupling. The successful MBE growth of 2D FM CrTe 2 films with room-temperature ferromagnetism opens a new avenue for developing large-scale 2D magnet-based spintronics devices.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1809160
NSF-PAR ID:
10324552
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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