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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: Integrative analysis of eQTL and GWAS summary statistics reveals transcriptomic alteration in Alzheimer brains
Abstract Background Large-scale genome-wide association studies have successfully identified many genetic variants significantly associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), such as rs429358, rs11038106, rs723804, rs13591776, and more. The next key step is to understand the function of these SNPs and the downstream biology through which they exert the effect on the development of AD. However, this remains a challenging task due to the tissue-specific nature of transcriptomic and proteomic data and the limited availability of brain tissue.In this paper, instead of using coupled transcriptomic data, we performed an integrative analysis of existing GWAS findings and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) results from AD-related brain regions to estimate the transcriptomic alterations in AD brain. Results We used summary-based mendelian randomization method along with heterogeneity in dependent instruments method and were able to identify 32 genes with potential altered levels in temporal cortex region. Among these, 10 of them were further validated using real gene expression data collected from temporal cortex region, and 19 SNPs from NECTIN and TOMM40 genes were found associated with multiple temporal cortex imaging phenotype. Conclusion Significant pathways from enriched gene networks included neutrophil degranulation, Cell surface interactions at the vascular wall, and Regulation of TP53 activity which are more » still relatively under explored in Alzheimer’s Disease while also encouraging a necessity to bind further trans-eQTL effects into this integrative analysis. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1942394 1755836
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10324579
Journal Name:
BMC Medical Genomics
Volume:
15
Issue:
S2
ISSN:
1755-8794
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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