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Title: Momentum-resolved electronic structure and band offsets in an epitaxial NbN/GaN superconductor/semiconductor heterojunction
The electronic structure of heterointerfaces is a pivotal factor for their device functionality. We use soft x-ray angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to directly measure the momentum-resolved electronic band structures on both sides of the Schottky heterointerface formed by epitaxial films of the superconducting NbN on semiconducting GaN, and determine their momentum-dependent interfacial band offset as well as the band-bending profile. We find, in particular, that the Fermi states in NbN are well separated in energy and momentum from the states in GaN, excluding any notable electronic cross-talk of the superconducting states in NbN to GaN. We support the experimental findings with first-principles calculations for bulk NbN and GaN. The Schottky barrier height obtained from photoemission is corroborated by electronic transport and optical measurements. The momentum-resolved understanding of electronic properties of interfaces elucidated in our work opens up new frontiers for the quantum materials where interfacial states play a defining role.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1719875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10325710
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
7
Issue:
52
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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