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This content will become publicly available on February 22, 2023

Title: Whole-Genome Duplication and Host Genotype Affect Rhizosphere Microbial Communities
ABSTRACT The composition of microbial communities found in association with plants is influenced by host phenotype and genotype. However, the ways in which specific genetic architectures of host plants shape microbiomes are unknown. Genome duplication events are common in the evolutionary history of plants and influence many important plant traits, and thus, they may affect associated microbial communities. Using experimentally induced whole-genome duplication (WGD), we tested the effect of WGD on rhizosphere bacterial communities in Arabidopsis thaliana . We performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to characterize differences between microbiomes associated with specific host genetic backgrounds (Columbia versus Landsberg) and ploidy levels (diploid versus tetraploid). We modeled relative abundances of bacterial taxa using a hierarchical Bayesian approach. We found that host genetic background and ploidy level affected rhizosphere community composition. We then tested to what extent microbiomes derived from a specific genetic background or ploidy level affected plant performance by inoculating sterile seedlings with microbial communities harvested from a prior generation. We found a negative effect of the tetraploid Columbia microbiome on growth of all four plant genetic backgrounds. These findings suggest an interplay between host genetic background and ploidy level and bacterial community assembly with potential ramifications for host fitness. more » Given the prevalence of ploidy-level variation in both wild and managed plant populations, the effects on microbiomes of this aspect of host genetic architecture could be a widespread driver of differences in plant microbiomes. IMPORTANCE Plants influence the composition of their associated microbial communities, yet the underlying host-associated genetic determinants are typically unknown. Genome duplication events are common in the evolutionary history of plants and affect many plant traits. Using Arabidopsis thaliana , we characterized how whole-genome duplication affected the composition of rhizosphere bacterial communities and how bacterial communities associated with two host plant genetic backgrounds and ploidy levels affected subsequent plant growth. We observed an interaction between ploidy level and genetic background that affected both bacterial community composition and function. This research reveals how genome duplication, a widespread genetic feature of both wild and crop plant species, influences bacterial assemblages and affects plant growth. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Bulgarelli, Davide
Award ID(s):
1655726
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10326763
Journal Name:
mSystems
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2379-5077
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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