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Title: Conditional Gaussian nonlinear system: A fast preconditioner and a cheap surrogate model for complex nonlinear systems
Developing suitable approximate models for analyzing and simulating complex nonlinear systems is practically important. This paper aims at exploring the skill of a rich class of nonlinear stochastic models, known as the conditional Gaussian nonlinear system (CGNS), as both a cheap surrogate model and a fast preconditioner for facilitating many computationally challenging tasks. The CGNS preserves the underlying physics to a large extent and can reproduce intermittency, extreme events, and other non-Gaussian features in many complex systems arising from practical applications. Three interrelated topics are studied. First, the closed analytic formulas of solving the conditional statistics provide an efficient and accurate data assimilation scheme. It is shown that the data assimilation skill of a suitable CGNS approximate forecast model outweighs that by applying an ensemble method even to the perfect model with strong nonlinearity, where the latter suffers from filter divergence. Second, the CGNS allows the development of a fast algorithm for simultaneously estimating the parameters and the unobserved variables with uncertainty quantification in the presence of only partial observations. Utilizing an appropriate CGNS as a preconditioner significantly reduces the computational cost in accurately estimating the parameters in the original complex system. Finally, the CGNS advances rapid and statistically accurate algorithms more » for computing the probability density function and sampling the trajectories of the unobserved state variables. These fast algorithms facilitate the development of an efficient and accurate data-driven method for predicting the linear response of the original system with respect to parameter perturbations based on a suitable CGNS preconditioner. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2108856
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10329149
Journal Name:
Chaos
Volume:
32
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
053122
ISSN:
1089-7682
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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