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This content will become publicly available on April 11, 2023

Title: Assessment of Task and Joint-Based Exoskeleton Designs for Elbow Joint Rehabilitation
Exoskeletons and robots have been used as a common practice to assist and automate rehabilitation exercises. Exoskeleton fitting and alignments are important factors and challenges that need to be addressed for smooth and safe operations and better outcomes. Such challenges often dictate the exoskeleton design approaches. Some focus on simplifying and mimicking human joints (joint-based) while others have a focus on a specific task (task-based), which does not need to align with the corresponding limb joint/s to generate the desired anatomical motion. In this study, the two design approaches are assessed in an elbow flexion-extension task. The muscle responses have been collected and compared with and without the exoskeletons. Based on 6 with no disability participants, the normalized Electromyography (EMG) RMS values are plotted. The plot profiles and magnitudes are used as a base to assess the exoskeleton alignment. For this specific task, the task-based exoskeleton has shown a profile closer to the one without exoskeleton with a relatively identical support as the joint-based one; the latter is evidenced through most subjects’ muscle response magnitudes. This preliminary data has shown a good methodology and insight towards the assessment of exoskeletons, but more human subject data is needed with different task more » combinations to further strengthen the findings. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1915872
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10329437
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Biomedical Devices
Volume:
84815
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
V001T07A002
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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