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Title: Effects of nutrient depletion on tissue growth in a tissue engineering scaffold pore
Award ID(s):
2108161
NSF-PAR ID:
10330496
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Physics of Fluids
Volume:
33
Issue:
12
ISSN:
1070-6631
Page Range / eLocation ID:
121903
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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