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Title: Dynamics of Florida milk production and total phosphate in Lake Okeechobee
A central tenant of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is nutrient reduction to levels supportive of ecosystem health. A particular focus is phosphorus. We examine links between agricultural production and phosphorus concentration in the Everglades headwaters: Kissimmee River basin and Lake Okeechobee, considered an important source of water for restoration efforts. Over a span of 47 years we find strong correspondence between milk production in Florida and total phosphate in the lake, and, over the last decade, evidence that phosphorus concentrations in the lake water column may have initiated a long-anticipated decline.
Authors:
; ; ;
Editors:
Doi, Hideyuki
Award ID(s):
1660584 1655203
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10331396
Journal Name:
PLOS ONE
Volume:
16
Issue:
8
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
e0248910
ISSN:
1932-6203
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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