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Title: Parallel mining of large maximal quasi-cliques
Given a user-specified minimum degree threshold γ, a γ-quasi-clique is a subgraph where each vertex connects to at least γ fraction of the other vertices. Quasi-clique is a natural definition for dense structures, so finding large and hence statistically significant quasi-cliques is useful in applications such as community detection in social networks and discovering significant biomolecule structures and pathways. However, mining maximal quasi-cliques is notoriously expensive, and even a recent algorithm for mining large maximal quasi-cliques is flawed and can lead to a lot of repeated searches. This paper proposes a parallel solution for mining maximal quasi-cliques that is able to fully utilize CPU cores. Our solution utilizes divide and conquer to decompose the workloads into independent tasks for parallel mining, and we addressed the problem of (i) drastic load imbalance among different tasks and (ii) difficulty in predicting the task running time and the time growth with task subgraph size, by (a) using a timeout-based task decomposition strategy, and by (b) utilizing a priority task queue to schedule long-running tasks earlier for mining and decomposition to avoid stragglers. Unlike our conference version in PVLDB 2020 where the solution was built on a distributed graph mining framework called G-thinker, this more » paper targets a single-machine multi-core environment which is more accessible to an average end user. A general framework called T-thinker is developed to facilitate the programming of parallel programs for algorithms that adopt divide and conquer, including but not limited to our quasi-clique mining algorithm. Additionally, we consider the problem of directly mining large quasi-cliques from dense parts of a graph, where we identify the repeated search issue of a recent method and address it using a carefully designed concurrent trie data structure. Extensive experiments verify that our parallel solution scales well with the number of CPU cores, achieving 26.68× runtime speedup when mining a graph with 3.77M vertices and 16.5M edges with 32 mining threads. Additionally, mining large quasi-cliques from dense parts can provide an additional speedup of up to 89.46×. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1755464
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10331915
Journal Name:
The VLDB journal
ISSN:
1066-8888
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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