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Title: Impacts of Riparian and Non-riparian Woody Encroachment on Tallgrass Prairie Ecohydrology
Award ID(s):
1911969 2024388 2025849
NSF-PAR ID:
10333967
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Ecosystems
ISSN:
1432-9840
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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