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This content will become publicly available on May 1, 2023

Title: Building capacity for socio-ecological change through the campus farm: a mixed-methods study
Given the ongoing socio-ecological crises, higher education institutions need curricular interventions to support students in developing the knowledge, skills, and perspectives needed to create a sustainable future. Campus farms are increasingly becoming sites for sustainability and environmental education toward this end. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a farm-situated place-based experiential learning (PBEL) intervention in two undergraduate biology courses and one environmental studies course over two academic years. We conducted a mixed-method study using pre/post-surveys and focus groups to examine the relationship between the PBEL intervention and students’ sense of place and expressions of pro-environmentalism. The quantitative analysis indicated measurable shifts in students’ place attachment and place-meaning scores. The qualitative findings illustrate a complex relationship between students’ academic/career interests, backgrounds, and pro-environmentalism. We integrated these findings to generate a model of sustainability learning through PBEL and argue for deepening learning to encourage active participation in socio-ecological change.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1915313
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10336279
Journal Name:
Environmental Education Research
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 20
ISSN:
1350-4622
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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