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Title: The role of place attachment and situated sustainability meaning-making in enhancing student civic-mindedness: A campus farm example.
This research explores the role that place attachment and place meaning towards an urban farm play in predicting undergraduate students’ civic-mindedness, an important factor in sustainability and social change. In 2017 and 2018, three STEM courses at a private university in the Midwest incorporated a local urban farm as a physical and conceptual context for teaching course content and sustainability concepts. Each course included a four to six-week long place-based experiential learning (PBEL) module aimed at enhancing undergraduate STEM student learning outcomes, particularly place attachment, situated sustainability meaning-making (SSMM), and civic-mindedness. End-of-course place attachment, SSMM, and civic-mindedness survey data were collected from students involved in these courses and combined with institutionally provided demographic information. Place attachment and SSMM surveys, along with the course in which the students participated, were statistically significant predictors of students’ civic mindedness score.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1915313
NSF-PAR ID:
10336282
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of sustainability education
Volume:
26
ISSN:
2151-7452
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1-20
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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