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This content will become publicly available on April 27, 2023

Title: Effects of nanoaggregation on isoindigo-based fluorophores for near-infrared bioimaging applications
In this work, we have taken a donor–acceptor–donor (D–A–D) fluorophore ( II-EDOT-TPA ) and encapsulated it using a linear dendritic block copolymer (LDBC). In parallel, a polyethylene glycol derivative ( PEG-II-EDOT-TPA ) was synthesized. The self-assembly and colloidal properties of both nanoaggregates were comparatively assessed. Photophysical and morphological characterization of the LDBC encapsulated II-EDOT-TPA and PEG-II-EDOT-TPA nanoaggregates was performed, which showed the photophysical and morphological properties differed greatly when comparing the two. Both nanoaggregate types were incubated with HEK-293 cells in order to measure cell viability and perform confocal fluorescence microscopy. Minimal cytotoxicity values (<20%) were seen with the two nanoaggregate forms, while both types of nanoaggregates were found to accumulate into the lysosomes of the HEK-293 cells. This work provides fascinating insights into NIR fluorophore design and methods to effectively alter the photophysical and morphological properties of the nanoaggregates for bio-imaging purposes.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1757220
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10336591
Journal Name:
Molecular Systems Design & Engineering
ISSN:
2058-9689
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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