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Title: CASTing a Net: Supporting Teachers with Search Technology
Past and current research has typically focused on ensuring that search technology for the classroom serves children. In this paper, we argue for the need to broaden the research focus to include teachers and how search technology can aid them. In particular, we share how furnishing a behind-the-scenes portal for teachers can empower them by providing a window into the spelling, writing, and concept connection skills of their students.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1763649
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10337070
Journal Name:
KidRec '21: 5th International and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Children \& Recommender and Information Retrieval Systems (KidRec) Search and Recommendation Technology through the Lens of a Teacher - Co-located with ACM IDC 2021
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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