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This content will become publicly available on June 1, 2023

Title: Scalable and Demography-Agnostic Confinement Strategies for COVID-19 Pandemic with Game Theory and Graph Algorithms
In the past, epidemics such as AIDS, measles, SARS, H1N1 influenza, and tuberculosis caused the death of millions of people around the world. In response, intensive research is evolving to design efficient drugs and vaccines. However, studies warn that new pandemics such as Coronavirus (COVID-19), variants, and even deadly pandemics can emerge in the future. The existing epidemic confinement approaches rely on a large amount of available data to determine policies. Such dependencies could cause an irreversible effect before proper strategies are developed. Furthermore, the existing approaches follow a one-size-fits-all control technique, which might not be effective. To overcome this, in this work, we develop a game-theory-inspired approach that considers societal and economic impacts and formulates epidemic control as a non-zero-sum game. Further, the proposed approach considers the demographic information that provides a tailored solution to each demography. We explore different strategies, including masking, social distancing, contact tracing, quarantining, partial-, and full-lockdowns and their combinations, and present demography-aware optimal solutions to confine a pandemic with minimal history information and optimal impact on the economy. To facilitate scalability, we propose a novel graph learning approach, which learns from the previously obtained COVID-19 game outputs and mobility rates of one state (region) more » depending on the other to produce an optimal solution. Our optimal solution is strategized to restrict the mobility between states based on the impact they are causing on COVID-19 spread. We aim to control the COVID-19 spread by more than 50% and model a dynamic solution that can be applied to different strains of COVID-19. Real-world demographic conditions specific to each state are created, and an optimal strategic solution is obtained to reduce the infection rate in each state by more than 50%. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2029291
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10337258
Journal Name:
COVID
Volume:
2
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
767 to 792
ISSN:
2673-8112
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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