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Title: Results From an Einstein@Home Search for Continuous Gravitational Waves From G347.3 at Low Frequencies in LIGO O2 Data
Abstract We present results of a search for periodic gravitational wave signals with frequencies between 20 and 400 Hz from the neutron star in the supernova remnant G347.3-0.5 using LIGO O2 public data. The search is deployed on the volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, with thousands of participants donating compute cycles to make this endeavour possible. We find no significant signal candidate and set the most constraining upper limits to date on the amplitude of gravitational wave signals from the target, corresponding to deformations below 10 −6 in a large part of the band. At the frequency of best strain sensitivity, near 166 Hz, we set 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave intrinsic amplitude of h 0 90 % ≈ 7.0 × 10 − 26 . Over most of the frequency range our upper limits are a factor of 20 smaller than the indirect age-based upper limit.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1816904
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10339052
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
925
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
8
ISSN:
0004-637X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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