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This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2023

Title: Orchestrating the Multidisciplinary Implementation of a Narrative-Centered Learning Environment in Upper Elementary Classrooms.
Integration of computational thinking (CT) within STEM subjects is common, although not often at the elementary school level where teachers have minimal experience with CT. We have designed and are refining INFUSECS, a narrative-centered digital learning environment to support upper elementary students’ CT and science knowledge construction as they create digital stories. We used orchestration as our theoretical framework, to examine how elementary teachers planned to approach this multidisciplinary implementation. Through a series of three focus groups, we learned that teachers planned for their students to take notes or utilize other graphic organizers to align the science content with the narrative planning, to engage in collaborative sense-making, and to observe the teacher modeling use of the INFUSECS system. Ultimately, the results have informed the next phase of our research design as we collect teacher and student level data as INFUSECS is utilized in authentic classroom settings.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1921495
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10340506
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1109-1112
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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