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Title: Bonding in nitrile photo-dissociating ruthenium drug candidates—A local vibrational mode study
In this work, we investigated bonding features of 15 ruthenium(II) nitrile complexes of the type [Ru(tpy)(L)-(CH 3 CN)] n+ , containing the tridentate tpy ligand (tpy = 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) and various bidentate ancillary ligands L; 12 compounds originally synthesized by Loftus et al. [J. Phys. Chem. C 123, 10291–10299 (2019)] and three new complexes. We utilized local vibrational force constants derived from the local mode theory as a quantitative measure of bond strength complemented with the topological analysis of the electron density and the natural bond orbital analysis. Loftus et al. suggested that nitrile dissociation occurs after light induced singlet–triplet transition of the original complexes and they used as a measure of nitrile release efficiency quantum yields for ligand exchange in water. They observed larger quantum yields for complexes with smaller singlet–triplet energy gaps. The major goal of this work was to assess how the Ru–NC and Ru–L bond strengths in these 15 compounds relate to and explain the experimental data of Loftus et al., particularly focusing on the question whether there is a direct correlation between Ru–NC bond strength and measured quantum yield. Our study provides the interesting result that the compounds with the highest quantum yields also have the more » strongest Ru–NC bonds suggesting that breaking the Ru–NC bond is not the driving force for the delivery process rather than the change of the metal framework as revealed by first results of a unified reaction valley approach investigation of the mechanism. Compounds with the highest quantum yield show larger electronic structure changes upon singlet–triplet excitation, i.e., larger changes in bond strength, covalency, and difference between the singlet and triplet HOMOs, with exception of the compound 12. In summary, this work provides new insights into the interplay of local properties and experimental quantum yields forming in synergy a useful tool for fine tuning of existing and future design of new nitrile releasing ruthenium compounds. We hope that this work will bring theoretical and experimental studies closer together and serves as an incubator for future collaboration between computational chemists and their experimental colleagues. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2102461
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10342536
Journal Name:
The Journal of Chemical Physics
Volume:
157
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
014301
ISSN:
0021-9606
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [2] M. Feiginov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 99, 233506, 2011. [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [3] Y. Nishida et al., Nature Sci. Reports, 9, 18125, 2019. [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [4] P. Fakhimi, et al., 2019 DRC Conference Digest. [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018).« less