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Title: The Habitable-zone Planet Finder Detects a Terrestrial-mass Planet Candidate Closely Orbiting Gliese 1151: The Likely Source of Coherent Low-frequency Radio Emission from an Inactive Star
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1910954 2108493
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10344429
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
919
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
L9
ISSN:
2041-8205
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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