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This content will become publicly available on June 1, 2023

Title: The Binary Black Hole Spin Distribution Likely Broadens with Redshift
Abstract The population-level distributions of the masses, spins, and redshifts of binary black holes (BBHs) observed using gravitational waves can shed light on how these systems form and evolve. Because of the complex astrophysical processes shaping the inferred BBH population, models allowing for correlations among these parameters will be necessary to fully characterize these sources. We hierarchically analyze the BBH population detected by LIGO and Virgo with a model allowing for correlations between the effective aligned spin and the primary mass and redshift. We find that the width of the effective spin distribution grows with redshift at 98.6% credibility. We determine this trend to be robust under the application of several alternative models and additionally verify that such a correlation is unlikely to be spuriously introduced using a simulated population. We discuss the possibility that this correlation could be due to a change in the natal black hole spin distribution with redshift.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2045740
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10344807
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
932
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
L19
ISSN:
2041-8205
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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