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Title: Self-supervised Regularization for Text Classification
Abstract Text classification is a widely studied problem and has broad applications. In many real-world problems, the number of texts for training classification models is limited, which renders these models prone to overfitting. To address this problem, we propose SSL-Reg, a data-dependent regularization approach based on self-supervised learning (SSL). SSL (Devlin et al., 2019a) is an unsupervised learning approach that defines auxiliary tasks on input data without using any human-provided labels and learns data representations by solving these auxiliary tasks. In SSL-Reg, a supervised classification task and an unsupervised SSL task are performed simultaneously. The SSL task is unsupervised, which is defined purely on input texts without using any human- provided labels. Training a model using an SSL task can prevent the model from being overfitted to a limited number of class labels in the classification task. Experiments on 17 text classification datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Code is available at https://github.com/UCSD-AI4H/SSReg.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2120019
NSF-PAR ID:
10345458
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics
Volume:
9
ISSN:
2307-387X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
641 to 656
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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